Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know

Over the years most of my research has been about science fiction and related genres, or film, and whilst this has required researching new topics or periods, a lot of information has just seaped in over the years.

Whilst this project is not entirely from scratch, there’s an awfully lot of things I feel that I need to know even if it is never relevant (although I have various facts already acquired):

  • pubs (taverns, inns, alehouses, beerhouses)
    • locations, names, publicans, ties of specific pubs
    • licensing laws
  • ale/beer
    • types
    • duty and excise
    • legislation
  • hops
    • species, cultivation, harvest
    • transportation
    • hop exchanges
    • storage
    • Wye and hops
  • malt
    • species, cultivation, harvest
    • transportation
    • regulation and taxation
    • malt houses
  • water
    • sources
    • Burtonisation
  • yeast
    • types
  • breweries
    • location and ownership
    • products
    • markets
    • marketing
    • estates
    • mergers

photo (9)

  • railways
    • links to London
    • links to coast
  • Canterbury
    • economic context c. 1750-present
    • paper
    • leather
    • tourism
    • revisions to town plans
    • 1930s planning
    • Post-World War II rebuilding
    • ring road development
    • relation to Kent
    • Kent and Canterbury identities
  • overseas markets
    • Baltic states/Russia
    • Napoleonic Blockade
    • Africa
    • India
    • Australia
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Canterbury – 1838

A listing thanks to Edward Wilmot’s Eighty “Lost” Inns of Canterbury:

  • George Ash (36 Watling Street)
  • William Beer (St Augustine Brewery and 65 Burgate)
  • John Saunders Bennett (Longport Brewery)
  • Charles Benham (St George’s Place)
  • Flint & Co (Stour Street)
  • George Fortune (35 Watling Street)
  • George Hacker (Watling Street)
  • William Rigden and Harriet Delmar (Hawkes [sic? Hawks?] Lane)
  • Francis Saunders (North Lane)
  • William & George Wall (Northgate Brewery, Duck Lane)
  • Flint & Kingsford (St Dunstan’s Street)

I think Flint & Co is the only premises surviving – there’s a business centre called The Old Brewery Business Centre (or similar), with a first floor with slats that looks as if it could be a hop-drying room, and a courtyard.

Rigdens also had premises on Beer Cart Lane. There are a couple of surviving buildings with first floor hatches – assuming this is a clue to their use – but I don’t know enough about brick work to judge age. One of them has a CJW 1865 stone on the side. The former George & Hoy inn closed in 1918 (Wilmot 31) and was pulled down to make way for an electricity substation. The premises were run by Beers (George? Alfred?). Next to this is the Beer Cart Arms and on the other side of the road is 1970s-vintage former council building.

Would it make sense for the Beer Cart Lane brewery to back onto Rigden and Delmar on Hawks Lane? There’s one building surviving that looks faintly industrial, but the frontage is more reserved, as is everything on that side of the road until the corner (the restored Capital House, I think once a pub, the City of London, but I’m not convinced).

I need to spend a few days going through city directories and city centre maps (I’m sure I have an OS map for Canterbury from the nineteenth century) – I also need to go to Duck Lane to see if I can spot anything there. There seem to be most breweries in the Whitefriars quarter of the city – the tannery takes up the Greyfriars, of course.

Breweries in Canterbury – A Start

These are just some notes on former breweries in Canterbury – partly taken from a useful webpage http://www.machadoink.com/The%20Breweries.htm, partly from Lesley Richmond and Alison Turton, The Brewing Industry: A Guide to Historical Records (Manchester: Manchester University Press), with contradictions between them. Primary research is called for, as well as much more.

No doubt there were more brewers in Canterbury. I’m guessing Bass had interests here in the late nineteenth century, but whether they brewed here or just owned a property, I don’t yet know.

ALFRED BEER & CO.
1770 founded by Mr Hill in Augustine’s Abbey gatehouse
1796 John Sauders Bennett partner with John Hill (founder’s son). William Beer replaces Hill.
1816 Bennett and Beer partnership dissolved
1844 Abbey bought and brewery moves to 9 Broad Street, son George Beer is partner
1850 Alfred new partner of William
1891 brewery bankrupt
1894 Alfred Walton sells brewery to Black Eagle Brewery, Westerham
1899 premises sold to Idris Mineral Company
1978 premises demolished for Magistrate’s Court

DANE JOHN BREWERY
c. 1840 J. B. Jude, Kent Brewery, Wateringbury, Kent
1875 corner of St John’s Lane and Watling Street sold by Michael Bass to George Ash
1878 Jude, Hanbury & Co.
1919 Jude, Hanbury & Co limited liability company
1923 acquire Ash’s East Kent Brewery (East Kent Brewery had been in Sandwich?)
1924 brewing transferred from Wateringbury to Canterbury
1929 acquired by Whitbread
1933 stops brewing
1936 brewery closed?
Now site of St Andrew’s Church

DEAN & SON??

LONGPORT BREWERY
c. 1826 by John Saunders Bennett who had co-run Alfred Beer

NORTHGATE BREWERY
On St John’s Hospital site
1923 acquired by Fremlins

RIGDEN AND DELMAR’S BREWERY
c. 1750 Rigden founded in Faversham
1824 Rigden, Pierce & Co., Beercart Lane
c. 1829 Rigden and Delmar, Rigden, Delmar and Pierce associated with Canterbury
1922 merges with George Beer, trade as George Beer and Rigdens
1932 Charles Rigden dies

STAR BREWERY
c. 1845. built by George Beer against the wall 112 Broad Street – George was son of William Beer of Alfred Beer.
1877 George Beer & Co
1883 sold to William Charles Newton Chapman, Stanley Hamilton Lound and Francis Gibbon Oliver as the George Beer Company
1887 acquire Dover Brewery Company
1919 George Beer & Co Ltd
1922 merges with W.E. and J. Rigdens, trade as George Beer and Rigdens
1927 public company
1931 acquire Breeds and Co, Hastings Brewery
1949 acquired by Fremlins
1935 demolished

ST. DUNSTAN’S BREWERY
1780 Robert Fenner’s brewing at Stour Street purchased by son-in-law Thomas Flint
1797 founded at Roper House, 33 St Dunstan’s Street by Frederick Flint and Sons
1892 Flint & Sons Ltd as limited liability company
1903 bought by Flint & Co Ltd
1904 acquires F.A. White, Stourmouth Brewery, Stourmouth, Kent
1923 acquired by Alfred Leney & Co Ltd, Phoenix Brewery, Dover
1929 stops brewing
1939 becomes hotel
1959 company liquidated

Breweries of Kent and Kentish Breweries: A Chronology

I’ve been blithely saying the number of breweries in Kent has doubled or something in the last ten years. Let’s crunch the statistics. This obviously omits the closed breweries of Kent, a topic that demands much more research than I have time to do right now.

More Than Ten Years Ago:

1. Shepherd Neame (1698)
2. Goacher’s (1983)
3. Larkins (1987)
4. Nelson (1995)
5. Hopdaemon (2000)
6. Swan On The Green (2000)
7. Millis (2002)
8. Ramsgate aka Gadds (2002)

Five to Ten Years Ago:
9. Whitstable (2003)
10. Westerham (2004)

In Last Five Years:
11. Moodleys (2008)
12. Old Dairy (2009)
13. Wantsum (2009)
14. Abigale (2010)
15. The Canterbury Ales (2010)
16. Farriers Arms (2010)
17. Kent (2010)
18. Royal Tunbridge Wells (2010)
19. Tonbridge (2010)
20. Black Cat (2011)
21. Canterbury (2011)
22. Hop Fuzz (2011)
23. Rockin’ Robin (2011)
24. Caveman (2012)
25. Goody (2012)
26. Ripple Steam Brewery (2012)
27. Tir Dha Ghlas Brewery (2012)